Category: Volume 4

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Manifesting the Internet: A Review of Dmytri Kleiner’s The Telekommunist Manifesto [1]

Zac ZimmerVirginia polytechnic institute and state university Volume 4, 2013 The introduction of new media […] is never entirely revolutionary: new media are less points of epistemic rupture than they are socially embedded sites for the ongoing negotiation of meaning as such. —Lisa Gitelman, Always Already New At the heart of any debate regarding the structure and...

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Bruno Bosteels,The Actuality of Communism, Verso, 2011, 304 pages

Joshua CloverUniversity of California, Davis Volume 4, 2013 Bruno Bosteels’ estimably lucid assessment of recent communist thought (“the idea of communism” or “the communist hypothesis”, depending on the landmark volume, conference, or Verso series taken as touchstone) opens with a reminder of the most incisive definition on offer, from The German Ideology: “We call communism the real movement which...

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Representación y Cinismo después del 11 de septiembre

Sergio RojasUniversidad de Chile Volume 4, 2013 En su artículo “El latinoamericanismo después de 9/11” (2010) John Beverley se pregunta: “¿cuál es la relación entre los estudios subalternos y un nuevo latinoamericanismo, capaz de enfrentar la hegemonía norteamericana y desarrollar las posibilidades latentes de sus pueblos?” (99). A esta interrogante necesitamos contraponer la cuestión acerca de...

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Nation, People and Politics in the Perspective of their Becoming

Horacio LegrásUniversity of California, Irvine Volume 4, 2013 Latinamericanism after 9/11 is a provocative, far- reaching and fascinating book. In responding to it, I was first inclined to select a single chapter or a well-defined problem only to find my argument spilling over into other areas of the book. I decided finally to confront some aspects of...

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Deconstruction and Latinamericanism, Reconsidered (A Propos John Beverley’s Latinamericanism after 9/11)

Kate JenckesUniversity of Michigan Volume 4, 2013 John Beverley’s Latinamericanism after 9/11 (Duke UP 2011) is a provocative account of some of the primary tendencies of how Latin America has been thought over the past decade. Its method is cartographic, in both the good and bad senses of the word. The book aims to create a map that...

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Politics Against Ethics

Erin Graff ZivinUniversity of Southern California Volume 4, 2013 Politics begins with a major wrong: the gap created by the empty freedom of the people between the arithmetical order and the geometric order. […] It is the introduction of an incommensurable at the heart of the distribution of speaking bodies. This incommensurable breaks not only with...

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Critique of Critique

Patrick DoveIndiana University Volume 4, 2013 John Beverley’s Latinamericanism after 9/11 seeks to reposition the field of Latin American Studies in response to what he views as a new historical conjuncture associated with the aftermath of September 11, 2001. Whereas in the US and Europe the impact of 9/11 is perceived mainly through the refocusing of foreign policy...

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On Latinamericanism after 9/11

Adriana Michele Campos JohnsonUniversity of California, Irvine Volume 4, 2013 The politics of dis-appointment slip into the breach following from the slippages and failings of a Politics of Hope. Dis-appointment concerns the refusals precisely of appointments positivistically (etymologically) understood. — David Theo Goldberg, “Epistemologies of Deception” John Beverley’s Latinamericanism after 9/11 is invaluable in its proposal to map...

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Prospero’s Book

Jon Beasley-MurrayUniversity of British Columbia Volume 4, 2013 Gentle breath of yours my sailsMust fill, or else my project fails. — William Shakespeare, The Tempest John Beverley presents himself as the grand old man of Latin American cultural studies. And with reason. He was there at the outset in the early 1990s, and has figured in almost...

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Introduction: My Only Latin Americanism

Samuel SteinbergUniversity of Southern California Volume 4, 2013 For the generation to which I belong, there is only Latin Americanism after 9/11. We have only walked its divided path, lived in the shadow of its faded alliances, and known the track of its “career” by lumbering through its ruins (both the ruins of a previous Latin...